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Photo of Daniel L. Schacter

Are Google and smartphones degrading our memories? Professor Daniel L. Schacter responds.

October 22, 2021

According to Harvard psychologist Daniel L. Schacter, tragic cases of forgotten children started to rise near the turn of the millennium, just as new safety rules began requiring children to be placed in car seats in the back. “You would never think that that could produce a problem with forgetting because the child is no longer visible, but sadly it has,” said Schacter, author of “The Seven Sins of Memory: How the Mind Forgets...

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Professor Steven Pinker on Rationality

Professor Steven Pinker on Rationality

October 14, 2021

At a time when belief in science appears to be waning, conspiracy theories seem to be on the rise, and many Americans cannot agree on basic facts, Steven Pinker argues for a return to rational thought and public discourse in his latest book, “Rationality: What It Is, Why It Seems Scarce, Why It Matters.” Pinker, Harvard’s Johnstone Family Professor of Psychology, and author of “The Better Angels of Our Nature,” and “Enlightenment Now,” thinks “we will always need to push back against our own irrationality,”...

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Photo of Jim Sidanius in his office

James Sidanius, who theorized societies are built on ethno-racial hierarchies, dies at 75

July 8, 2021

ames H. Sidanius devoted much of his career to the pursuit of one question: Why are societies always hierarchical, with some groups at the top and others at the bottom?

The John Lindsley Professor of Psychology in memory of William James and of African and African American Studies, who died June 29 at age 75, knew from a young age how inequality and oppression functioned in his own society. He got involved in Civil Rights, Black liberation, and anti-war activism as a teenager in New York City, and saw that legislative efforts to win rights for Black people did not erase their...

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Jerome Kagan

Jerome Kagan, a 'towering' child psychologist across six decades, dies at 92

June 2, 2021

 

Jerome Kagan, whose relentless curiosity and formidable intelligence were as notable as his driving habits, died May 10 in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. He was 92 years old.

During his storied, six-decade career in developmental child psychology — 36 of them spent teaching at Harvard — Kagan unraveled previously held ideas and introduced new theories about how children’s behavior and traits develop from infancy through adolescence.

 

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Elizabeth A. Phelps

Elizabeth Phelps Wins George A. Miller Prize in Cognitive Neuroscience

October 29, 2020


Harvard professor Elizabeth A. Phelps was named this year’s winner of the George A. Miller Prize in Cognitive Neuroscience.

Winners of the prize are honored for a career characterized by distinguished and sustained scholarship and cutting-edge research in cognitive neuroscience that has the potential to revolutionize the field.

The prize is presented by the Cognitive Neuroscience Society and was established in 1995 to honor the career of psychologist George A. Miller. Miller was one of...

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Katie McLaughlin

Katie McLaughlin Awarded Prestigious MERIT Award from NIMH

February 12, 2020
MERIT Awards are nominated and awarded by NIH and “provide long-term, stable support to investigators whose research competence and productivity are distinctly superior and who are likely to continue to perform in an outstanding manner.”

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