Cognition, Brain, & Behavior

2017 Oct 04

Colloquium - Daphna Shohamy, PhD

4:00pm to 5:00pm

Location: 

William James Hall - Room 1, Basement Auditorium

Daphna Shohamy, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Psychology, Department of Psychology

Columbia University

https://psychology.columbia.edu/content/daphna-shohamy

The Learning Lab - http://shohamylab.psych.columbia.edu/index.php

Topic: TBA

 

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2017 Apr 26

Colloquium - Russell Poldrack, PhD

4:00pm to 5:00pm

Location: 

William James Hall - Room 1, Basement Auditorium

Russell Poldrack, PhD

Albert Ray Lang Professor of Psychology

Stanford University

https://psychology.stanford.edu/node/3229

https://poldracklab.stanford.edu/

Topic:   The future of fMRI in cognitive neuroscience

Abstract: Cognitive neuroscience has witnessed two decades of rapid growth, thanks in large part to the continued development of fMRI methods.  In my talk, I will question what this work has told us about brain function, and will propose that cognitive neuroscience needs to change in at least

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2016 Nov 02

Colloquium - Jenny Saffran, PhD

4:00pm to 5:00pm

Location: 

William James Hall - Room 1, Basement Auditorium

Jenny Saffran, PhD

 Professor of Psychology

University of Wisconsin - Madison

https://www.waisman.wisc.edu/pi-Saffran-Jenny.htm

Topic : Building a lexicon

  Abstract: 

Words are bundles of meanings and sounds (or signs). As mature language users, we have sophisticated knowledge about how words work, both on their own and as part of a lexicon. How does that knowledge emerge?

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Yaoda Xu Article in Nature Neuroscience

Yaoda Xu Article in Nature Neuroscience

December 1, 2015
Recent studies have provided conflicting accounts regarding where in the human brain visual short-term memory (VSTM) content is stored, with strong univariate fMRI responses being reported in superior intraparietal sulcus (IPS), but robust multivariate decoding being reported in occipital cortex. Given the continuous influx of information in everyday vision, VSTM storage under distraction is often required. We found that neither distractor presence nor predictability during the memory delay affected behavioral performance. Similarly, superior IPS exhibited consistent decoding of VSTM
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Pinpointing Punishment:  Joshua Buckholtz Featured in Harvard Gazette

Pinpointing Punishment: Joshua Buckholtz Featured in Harvard Gazette

October 29, 2015

Harvard Assistant Professor of Psychology Joshua Buckholtz explains how a brain region called the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex coordinates third-party punishment decisions of the type made by judges and juries. The findings were released in a paper co-authored by Buckholtz and René Marois of Vanderbilt University.

http://news.harvard.edu/gazette/story/2015/10/pinpointing-punishment/?utm_source=SilverpopMailing&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=10.29.2015%20(1)

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